Monday, March 16, 2020

Free Essays on The Outstation-Theme, Character, Conflict

W. Somerset Maugham’s â€Å"The Outstation† tells an entertaining story that comments on the human condition itself. It is a story based on the conflicts of two very different men. These characters seem drawn from reality, each living in their own little world. Pride blinds them to the world around them, and leads them to misery. Conflict and character are central to Maugham’s theme. Maugham reveals facets of the characters with a few techniques. Through dialogue, we get hints at what the characters feel about each other and themselves. We also find out what kind of people they are through their use of language. For example, it is clear in the way Mr. Warburton speaks that he is prim and cultivated. When Allen Cooper speaks, it is clear that he is rough around the edges because of his use of jargon. We also learn a lot about the character through the use of their actions. Daily routines and treatment of others by the characters give us more insight into who they are. Through authorial comment, the narration gives us more understanding of each character. These techniques also show us the building conflict in the story. The conflict between the two characters starts right at the beginning of the story when the Resident, Mr. Warburton, is first introduced to his new assistant, Allen Cooper. Bad chemistry and tension between the two is noticed immediately. Warburton and Cooper are very different men and this first scene illustrates this with their differences in mannerisms and language. Cooper speaks, at first, with â€Å"exuberant joviality.† Warburton is â€Å"polite†. Cooper speaks with slang and colloquialisms; he is very casual. Mr. Warburton speaks formally and is even frigid. Here the dialogue leads us to see their differences in class, age, and character. Mr. Warburton is a stout fifty-four year old man. When his face is described by the narrator, it is a â€Å"red face with pugnacious features† and â€Å"cle... Free Essays on The Outstation-Theme, Character, Conflict Free Essays on The Outstation-Theme, Character, Conflict W. Somerset Maugham’s â€Å"The Outstation† tells an entertaining story that comments on the human condition itself. It is a story based on the conflicts of two very different men. These characters seem drawn from reality, each living in their own little world. Pride blinds them to the world around them, and leads them to misery. Conflict and character are central to Maugham’s theme. Maugham reveals facets of the characters with a few techniques. Through dialogue, we get hints at what the characters feel about each other and themselves. We also find out what kind of people they are through their use of language. For example, it is clear in the way Mr. Warburton speaks that he is prim and cultivated. When Allen Cooper speaks, it is clear that he is rough around the edges because of his use of jargon. We also learn a lot about the character through the use of their actions. Daily routines and treatment of others by the characters give us more insight into who they are. Through authorial comment, the narration gives us more understanding of each character. These techniques also show us the building conflict in the story. The conflict between the two characters starts right at the beginning of the story when the Resident, Mr. Warburton, is first introduced to his new assistant, Allen Cooper. Bad chemistry and tension between the two is noticed immediately. Warburton and Cooper are very different men and this first scene illustrates this with their differences in mannerisms and language. Cooper speaks, at first, with â€Å"exuberant joviality.† Warburton is â€Å"polite†. Cooper speaks with slang and colloquialisms; he is very casual. Mr. Warburton speaks formally and is even frigid. Here the dialogue leads us to see their differences in class, age, and character. Mr. Warburton is a stout fifty-four year old man. When his face is described by the narrator, it is a â€Å"red face with pugnacious features† and â€Å"cle...

Sunday, March 15, 2020

Definition of Conjugation in English Grammar

Definition of Conjugation in English Grammar From the Latin join together, conjugation (pronunciation: kon-je-GA-shen) refers to the inflection of verbs for person, number, tense, and mood, also called a verbal paradigm. Conjugation In English Grammar Though the term conjugation is still used in some forms of traditional English grammar, contemporary linguists generally regard it as an unnecessary holdover from Latin and Old English. According to the  Oxford Companion to the English Language, the term conjugation is relevant to the grammar of Old English, in which there were seven conjugations of strong verbs, but not to Modern English, although irregular verbs can be divided into a number of pattern groups. Learning Conjugation Rules Remember when in grade school our teachers had us and the rest of class conjugate verbs? Together we pledged or maybe mumbled, I talk, You talk, He/She/It talks, We talk, You talk, They talk. Whatever language we were learning, at whatever age, conjugation taught us proper use of verb tenses, which in English are time distinctions grouped broadly by past, present, or future; also, each verb had to be connected to a personal pronoun acting as its subject.(Davis) Principle Parts Conjugation means breaking a verb down into its different forms to show person, number, tense, and voice.All verbs have three basic forms, which are called their principal parts. From these basic forms, you can make up the tense of any verb. The first principal part is the verb itself. This is the part with which you are most familiar: form, change, discuss. The second principal part is the past tense form. The third principal part is the past participle.(Williams) Aspects of Finiteness Frankly (and sadly) most of us learned basic conjugation in foreign-language class. We learned to conjugate verbs in Spanish, French, or Latin. Unfortunately, many people did not learn basic conjugation in English class. Some did not learn correct conjugation.When you conjugate a verb, you have to cover all three aspects of finiteness: time (thats tense), people (thats person, as in first person, second person, and third person), and quantity (thats number, either singular or plural.(Good) Verbal Paradigms: See and Talk Let us consider [...] the verbal paradigm in English to see how a paradigm works. A verb in English has several forms. The verb see has the forms see, sees, seeing, saw, and (have) seen. We take the lexical item itself to be see, which we pronounce see. Some of the forms of see are entirely predictable, some are not. When a form is predictable from the morphological paradigm, we say that it is regular; when a form is not predictable, it is irregular. So the form seen is not predictable as the past participle (She has never seen Paris like this), nor is the form saw as the past tense.On the other hand, a verb like talk is completely regular: talk, talks, talking, talked, and (have) talked. We want to capture the fact that saw and talked are both past tense forms, even though one is irregular and the other one is regular.(Culicover) The Lighter Side of Conjugations Rupinder continued to dominate the class, but she didnt seem to be learning anything. On a quiz at the end of the week she tried to conjugate the verb wake. Wake, she wrote. Past tense: woke. Past participle: wank. I didnt have the heart to tell her she was wrong.(Dixon) Conjugate This I cut class, you cut class, he, she, it cuts class. We cut class, they cut class. We all cut class. I cannot say this in Spanish because I did not go to Spanish today. Gracias a dios. Hasta luego.(Anderson) Resources and Further Reading Anderson, Laurie Halse. Speak. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1999.Culicover, Peter W. Natural Language Syntax. Oxford University, 2009.Davis, Bob. Your Writing Well. International, 2014.Dixon, Glenn. Pilgrim in the Palace of Words: A Journey Through the 6,000 Languages of Earth. Dundurn, 2009.Good, C. Edward. A Grammar Book for You and I... Oops, Me!: All the Grammar You Need to Succeed in Life. Capital, 2002.McArthur, Tom, et al., editors. Oxford Companion to the English Language. 2nd ed., Oxford University, 2018.Williams, Karen Schneiter. Basic English Review. 9th ed., Cengage, 2010.

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Mergers & Acquisitions Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2000 words

Mergers & Acquisitions - Essay Example A merger takes place when the firms involved in the combination are of unequal size. The larger or stronger firm continues to exist because of its stronger bargaining power and the smaller or weaker firms go out of existence. Four periods of economic history have witnessed very high levels of merger activity, which are called a merger waves. These periods are characterized by cyclical activity i.e. large number of mergers followed by relatively fewer mergers ((ICMR), 2003). The current period is called as the fifth wave. In the first three waves, merger activity was concentrated in the United States of America. The fourth and the fifth waves were global in nature though the impact of the wave is most pronounced in the United States of America. First Wave The first merger wave occurred after the depression of 1883. It peaked between 1898 and1902 though it began in 1897 and ended in 1904. The merger had the greatest impact on eight specific industries i.e. primary metals, bituminous coal, food products, chemicals, machinery, transportation equipment, petroleum and fabricated metal products. These industries accounted for almost two – thirds of the total mergers during these periods.The mergers in the first wave were predominantly horizontal combinations. These resulting industrial consolidations led to creation of large monopolies. For example, US steel founded by J P Morgan merged with Carnegie Steel founded by Andrew Carnegie.The merged firm US Steel also acquired several other smaller steel producers and the resulting giant capture 75% of the steel market of the United States of America. ... Second Wave The second merger wave occurred between 1916 and 1929. George Stigler, a winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, has contrasted the first wave as "merging for monopoly" and the second wave as "merging for oligopoly." The consolidation pattern resulted in the emergence of oligopolistic industrial structures. The second wave was primarily fuelled by the post World War I boom in America Economy and a buoyant capital market. The second merger wave lasted until the Great Depression. The wave ended with the stock market crash on the "Black Thursday" i.e. October 29th of the year 1929, when the stock market witnessed one of the steepest stock price falls in history. Some of the corporate giants like General Motors, International Business Machines (IBM), Union Carbide, and John Deere etc., are a product of this era. Third Wave The third merger wave occurred during 1965 to 1969. This wave featured a historically high level of merger activity. One of the reasons for this factor is that this wave occurred in the background of a booming American Economy. One of the new trends started by this wave was the acquisition of larger companies by smaller companies. In the waves prior to this, the acquirer was always bigger in size than the target. A large proportion of transactions that took place during this wave were conglomerate transactions. The conglomerates formed during this period were highly diversified and simultaneously operated in several unrelated industries. For example, during the sixties ITT acquired such diversified businesses like car rental firms, bakeries, consumer credit agencies, luxury hotels, airport parking firms,

Friday, February 28, 2020

Buddhism Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Buddhism - Essay Example The religious philosophy propagates that the widely popular belief in eternal soul, is a case of 'mistaken identity' where one or more of the skandhas are mistaken to be representative of an eternal soul. These five skandhas include: Form (rupa); feelings (vedana); perception (sajna); volitional factors (samskaras); and consciousness (vij-nana) ((Keown, 2003). Form or 'rupa' refers to the external features or characteristics of a human body such as form or color. Feelings or 'vedana' refers to sensations; Perception or 'sajna' refers to perceptions or mental images; volitional factors or ‘samskaras' refers to the power of mental formations and perception; and consciousness or 'vij-nana' refers to recognition and judgment (Hirakawa and Groner, 1993: 44). This doctrine further suggests that these five elements or aggregates are impermanent in nature i.e. 'anitya', and hence subject to change. It is on account of this very reason, that association with the notion of a permanent or unchanging 'self' is rendered false and any individual who associates with this false notion of a permanent self, is likely to suffer since impermanent things often result in suffering i.e. 'dukha'. For a Buddhist, an individual is comprised of these five aggregates which are subject to change, and hence and anything that is unchanging or permanent in nature cannot be associated with the concept of selfhood or personhood. Buddhism argues that this doctrine of "no independent self" is associated with the Buddhist doctrine of dependent/ conditioning origination i.e. 'pratiyasumtpada' (Palmquist, 2010). In Buddhism, there is no certain pre-defined concept of self. But the same is defined and explained by way of a series of impermanent and interdependent moments of consciousness (). For instance, according to the doctrine of conditioning origination i.e. 'ratiyasumtpada' the concept of self does not exist independently on its own, since the notion of self is empty / void. The emptiness of self in Buddhism does not imply non-existence of self, but instead refers to lack of autonomous self-nature i.e. 'nishvabhava'. Buddhism posits that the notion of personhood does not have an autonomous self existence, but instead is a consequence of certain conditions or 'pratyayas'. Thus the existence of personhood or self in Buddhism is dependent on several other factors, which are interconnected with each other and are mostly found in experiences which an individual goes through (Palmquist, 2010). The doctrine of personhood in Buddhism refers to the heretical view that human beings are gifted with a real 'self'. Buddhism essentially rejects the notion of an eternal self or 'atman'. Various religious groups within the religion, such as the 'Vatsiputriyas' had put forward the notion of an eternal self, in a bid to describe and explain the complex phenomenon of life after death, rebirth and karma. However according to the Buddhist religious theories, the concept of personhood wh ich is enshrined within the five aggregates, is derived from and dependent on them (Keown, 2003). Another more modern theory on the doctrine of Persoonhood was developed by a group known as the "Pudgalavadins" or the Personalists. This group was strongly opposed to the conventional and/or orthodox concept of anatta or no-self-ness, since it was difficult to comprehend and interpret. Contrary to the orthodox concept

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Middle School Classroom Management Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3500 words

Middle School Classroom Management - Essay Example Why do we eat fast food, in particular It is quick, easy, and comforting. Why do we complain or get angry Perhaps to influence others and to get rid of negative feelings. Why would we avoid meeting others or talking to people We're perfectly comfortable in our own little zone. And the list goes on and on. (Managing, 2006 p. 1). By the same token, why do we avoid good choices such as going to the dentist or doctor. Well, that one's obvious-it's costly and painful! Why don't we save money Because we want things now. Why don't we exercise or eat healthy foods Exercise is hard and preparing healthy foods takes time. For we adults, three steps are needed for us to obtain self-control: We need "standards," which means we need to know what we should do. Secondly we need to be aware if our behavior is failing to meet these standards, and finally, we need to be able to correct the behavior that is producing sub-standard behavior. (Managing, 2006 p. 4). The principles that we as adults can use to change our negative behaviors can translate into principles that we can teach middle school age children as well. These principles will create the lifelong ability for them to both monitor and modify their behavior in many areas of their lives. Of course children misbehave for a variety of reasons; it can be as simple as a cry for attention-good or bad-or as complicated as a difficult situation in their home life. A child may be troubled about an issue and acting our, or simply showing youthful exuberance which goes over the line into disruptive behavior. Many times a teacher is required to be much more than a teacher, and one of these things would be a psychiatrist. The teacher must come to know each and every individual student in such a way that it is obvious to her, even if not to others, just which of the above issues may be the at the root of the bad behavior. The first day of class student and teacher needs, rights and expectations should be openly discussed on the first day of class and reviewed periodically. The student's basic needs includes survival, belonging, power, fun and freedom and they have the right to learn without being disrupted by others. (Wiggins 2006 p. 2) In turn, the teacher has the right to expect the full attention of each and every student as well as the right to establish a learning environment that facilitates optimal success. (Charles 1992 p. 109). Even beyond these basic rights and expectations, the student is expected to come to class both prepared and with the desire to learn. They are expected to behave in a respectful manner both to teachers and other students, and accept any consequence of their own negative behavior. The teacher is expected to consider interesting curricula that both engages the student's full attention

Immigration issues in the USA Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2500 words

Immigration issues in the USA - Essay Example A nation without borders is not a nation and this country has been losing control of the borders for many decades, losing prosperity, security and autonomy along with them. The massive numbers of illegal aliens pouring across mainly the southern border has and continues to cause substantial economic, social and physical harms to legal citizens. These harms occur predominantly to those who are among the most vulnerable segments of the population: minorities, children and the poor. Harms to the poor, minorities and children are indeed occurring but mainly to illegal aliens. An argument can be made if they should be afforded similar rights and protections as legal citizens but not if they deserve human rights considerations. Many at all level of government and in state and federal legislatures have continually attempted to deny access to housing, schools, medical treatment and social programs to non-citizens. Some argue that U.S. laws apply to all within its borders, legally or not such as the Fifth Amendment right to due process of law. The laws certainly apply to all when they are broken. The federal government, to no one’s surprise, has been no help. ... Genesis of the Issue The fundamental reason for the flood of immigration from Latin America, specifically Mexico, is the disintegration of the Mexican economy predominantly resulting from free-trade strategies employed by the North American Free Trade Agreement and the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The rampant corruption within the Mexican government has also contributed significantly to the collapse of the Mexican economy. Due to IMF policies regarding Mexico, its economic output dropped 33 percent in the past two decades. During this period, its foreign debt rose 359 percent because of widespread looting of the national coffers. These factors caused the â€Å"collapse of all areas of productive economic activity and employment, is the primary driver of the flood of emigrants desperate to leave Mexico, to find some livelihood for themselves and their families in the United States† 1 Amnesty, an Unpopular Concept Reward for Crime Throughout the history of America, people of differing ideologies have generally agreed on immigration controls. Public opinion polls have continually shown an overwhelming opposition to illegal immigration as well as for the concept of amnesty. The majority of Americans believe amnesty for illegal aliens is merely a reward for law-breaking and by whatever name, causes ever escalating future illegal immigration. â€Å"No system depending on a strict regard for the rule of law can treat law-breaking so casually† 2 Those who favor amnesty for illegal aliens, specifically those crossing the southern border do not seem to realize that a crime has been committed and not, as they might have you believe, one without a victim. Simply enforcing the laws

Saturday, February 1, 2020

Marketing home work Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Marketing home work - Essay Example In a highly competitive environment of cut throat business, creating and keeping customers therefore becomes vital ingredient of the market strategy of the firms. Saxonville Sausages is a prime example of how brand strategies were used to position their product in the market. They had targeted family and homemakers who relished home cooked food. The advertisements showed women using Saxonville sausages to make different dishes and enjoying it with family. Thus it was able to create a niche market position. Through right positioning, it was able to revive its declining profits (Mullins & Walker, 2009). Mountain Man brewery case, on the other hand emphasizes the need for new product to meet the challenges of time. Mountain Man is established brand of lager with regional specialty that primarily caters to the niche market of coal miners. Its brand equity is associated with long history of coal mining and has a loyal customer base which now is elderly populace. The new light beer would meet the tastes of young generation but fears that it could threaten its brand equity. But this is a risk which the firm must take to maintain its competitive advantage in the industry. Market research is intrinsic part of business strategy that is used to identify and analyze changing customers’ requirements which the firms meet through new product development or value addition (Vandermerwe, 2004; McKenna, 1991). The buying behavior and surveys are important tools for qualitative and quantitative analysis that help deintify the changing trend of the consumers. For example, qualitative study would show that coke is a favorite drink but diet coke is preferred more because of its low calorie. On the other hand, quantitative research would indicate that coke is more popular than Pepsi. Various firms like Redbull, Reebok, Nike have used market research to identify their requirement that was used for new product